sasaq:

(via ドンタコスな日々) sasaq:

(via ドンタコスな日々) sasaq:

(via ドンタコスな日々)
spreadyourwiings:

socially-inactive:

pyroluminescence:

I’M

I LOVE YOU KAREN

Dying
spreadyourwiings:

socially-inactive:

pyroluminescence:

I’M

I LOVE YOU KAREN

Dying
asifitwereachoice:

The love story in Holes is so underrated.
asifitwereachoice:

The love story in Holes is so underrated.
asifitwereachoice:

The love story in Holes is so underrated.
asifitwereachoice:

The love story in Holes is so underrated.
asifitwereachoice:

The love story in Holes is so underrated.
asifitwereachoice:

The love story in Holes is so underrated.
asifitwereachoice:

The love story in Holes is so underrated.
asifitwereachoice:

The love story in Holes is so underrated.

asifitwereachoice:

The love story in Holes is so underrated.

(via princessofnerdingham)

huffpostarts:

Mesmerizing Photographs Prove Burning Man Is Far From Over
huffpostarts:

Mesmerizing Photographs Prove Burning Man Is Far From Over
huffpostarts:

Mesmerizing Photographs Prove Burning Man Is Far From Over
huffpostarts:

Mesmerizing Photographs Prove Burning Man Is Far From Over
huffpostarts:

Mesmerizing Photographs Prove Burning Man Is Far From Over
huffpostarts:

Mesmerizing Photographs Prove Burning Man Is Far From Over
smithsonian:

Chief S.O. Alonge did something previously unheard of during his 50 year engagement as the photographer of the royal court of Benin, Nigeria: he focused his lens back onto his own people. As the first indigenous royal court photographer, his photos shied away from the rigid, formal style of his colonial predecessors. 
Alonge’s photographs and legacy are remembered in a newly opened exhibition at the National Museum of African Art, “Chief S.O. Alonge: Photographer to the Royal Court of Benin, Nigeria.” The exhibit runs through Sept. 2015. You can read more about Alonge, as well as the exhibition, here. smithsonian:

Chief S.O. Alonge did something previously unheard of during his 50 year engagement as the photographer of the royal court of Benin, Nigeria: he focused his lens back onto his own people. As the first indigenous royal court photographer, his photos shied away from the rigid, formal style of his colonial predecessors. 
Alonge’s photographs and legacy are remembered in a newly opened exhibition at the National Museum of African Art, “Chief S.O. Alonge: Photographer to the Royal Court of Benin, Nigeria.” The exhibit runs through Sept. 2015. You can read more about Alonge, as well as the exhibition, here. smithsonian:

Chief S.O. Alonge did something previously unheard of during his 50 year engagement as the photographer of the royal court of Benin, Nigeria: he focused his lens back onto his own people. As the first indigenous royal court photographer, his photos shied away from the rigid, formal style of his colonial predecessors. 
Alonge’s photographs and legacy are remembered in a newly opened exhibition at the National Museum of African Art, “Chief S.O. Alonge: Photographer to the Royal Court of Benin, Nigeria.” The exhibit runs through Sept. 2015. You can read more about Alonge, as well as the exhibition, here. smithsonian:

Chief S.O. Alonge did something previously unheard of during his 50 year engagement as the photographer of the royal court of Benin, Nigeria: he focused his lens back onto his own people. As the first indigenous royal court photographer, his photos shied away from the rigid, formal style of his colonial predecessors. 
Alonge’s photographs and legacy are remembered in a newly opened exhibition at the National Museum of African Art, “Chief S.O. Alonge: Photographer to the Royal Court of Benin, Nigeria.” The exhibit runs through Sept. 2015. You can read more about Alonge, as well as the exhibition, here.

smithsonian:

Chief S.O. Alonge did something previously unheard of during his 50 year engagement as the photographer of the royal court of Benin, Nigeria: he focused his lens back onto his own people. As the first indigenous royal court photographer, his photos shied away from the rigid, formal style of his colonial predecessors. 

Alonge’s photographs and legacy are remembered in a newly opened exhibition at the National Museum of African Art, “Chief S.O. Alonge: Photographer to the Royal Court of Benin, Nigeria.” The exhibit runs through Sept. 2015. You can read more about Alonge, as well as the exhibition, here.

beyondskyrim:

Stros M’Kai beyondskyrim:

Stros M’Kai

This scene never fails to make me laugh :’)

This scene never fails to make me laugh :’)

(via kikisdelivery)

operationfailure:

My friend Maggie, at the young age of 34, just found out she has a twin, and now it’s up to all of us to help her find them!

I love a mystery!

Please share this photo!

(via mydrunkkitchen)

virtualgeometry:

Herbert Hamak / 2013 / Studio La Citta

(via jencheema)

bbcnewsus:

The photographer who rejected racism in the American south
"I did not know my grandfather but I am very proud that he was able to capture these people in pictures - whether they were black or white, rich or poor, farmers or businessmen," says Martha Sumler.
In an era that was marked by growing racial discrimination and the introduction of what were known as the “Jim Crow” segregation laws, a relatively unknown photographer, Hugh Mangum, did a rare thing - he opened his doors to everyone regardless of their race, gender or how much money they had.
His photographs are not only unusual for the diverse range of people in them but also because more than a few of his subjects seem to be enjoying themselves.

"Often at the end of a sequence of pictures, you see people smiling, laughing, throwing their heads back," explains McCarty. "These comfortable and candid poses were a real hallmark of Mangum’s style."

Hugh Mangum Photographs courtesy of David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University. bbcnewsus:

The photographer who rejected racism in the American south
"I did not know my grandfather but I am very proud that he was able to capture these people in pictures - whether they were black or white, rich or poor, farmers or businessmen," says Martha Sumler.
In an era that was marked by growing racial discrimination and the introduction of what were known as the “Jim Crow” segregation laws, a relatively unknown photographer, Hugh Mangum, did a rare thing - he opened his doors to everyone regardless of their race, gender or how much money they had.
His photographs are not only unusual for the diverse range of people in them but also because more than a few of his subjects seem to be enjoying themselves.

"Often at the end of a sequence of pictures, you see people smiling, laughing, throwing their heads back," explains McCarty. "These comfortable and candid poses were a real hallmark of Mangum’s style."

Hugh Mangum Photographs courtesy of David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

bbcnewsus:

The photographer who rejected racism in the American south

"I did not know my grandfather but I am very proud that he was able to capture these people in pictures - whether they were black or white, rich or poor, farmers or businessmen," says Martha Sumler.

In an era that was marked by growing racial discrimination and the introduction of what were known as the “Jim Crow” segregation laws, a relatively unknown photographer, Hugh Mangum, did a rare thing - he opened his doors to everyone regardless of their race, gender or how much money they had.

His photographs are not only unusual for the diverse range of people in them but also because more than a few of his subjects seem to be enjoying themselves.

"Often at the end of a sequence of pictures, you see people smiling, laughing, throwing their heads back," explains McCarty. "These comfortable and candid poses were a real hallmark of Mangum’s style."

Hugh Mangum Photographs courtesy of David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

yellew:

quietandsarcastic:

Read it again:  EVERY.  SINGLE.  REPUBLICAN.  Yes, that includes women. 

unreal.

(via johnblacksads)

safetytank:

i mISTOOK THE POLE CAP FOR PART OF ITS FACE

(via princessofnerdingham)